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20130115
20130123
STATION
KQEH (PBS) 16
LANGUAGE
English 16
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)
PBS
Jan 16, 2013 6:30pm PST
for a narrow definition of what it means for the government to default. skipping payments on government bonds would be a default they say. but skipping payments for other government services wouldn't be. this debate could have real consequences, as darren gersh explains. >> reporter: next month, the u.s. government will owe $38 billion in interest payments on the debt it's sold to investors here and overseas. but the u.s. government will take in about $210 billion in tax revenues in february. a vocal minority in washington now argues those figures show it is possible for the u.s. government to avoid defaulting on its debts even if the debt ceiling is not raised. >> and there is no reason for the government to default unless president obama and the democrats want us to. it's just a scare tactic to continue the spending that they don't want to address. that's why they keep saying, "oh, we're going to default. we're going to default. we're going to default." it's just not true. >> reporter: but talk like that scares many budget analysts in washington. they argue markets will see a failure by the
PBS
Jan 19, 2013 12:30pm PST
't really want the al qaeda affiliate to establish its roots there. the government is weak. it's not a democratic government. and so defense secretary leon panetta has said that the u.s. government is willing to assist the french with logistics and intelligence. the drones you mentioned are not -- they would not be armed drones. they would be intelligence gathering drones but the french have taken the lead on n. i think so far the u.s. is standing on the side lienls pretty much -- sidelines pretty much cheering them on because it's an important mission. >> we've sent 55,000 americans there according to-- >> 50 million? >> what is it? 550 americans and they are there not as soldiers but there to help with equipment and so forth. >> this is an area, northern mali is an area the size of texas. and you've got-- >> twice the size of texas. >> you have al qaeda in there and the french with 500 troops. they're not going to recapture that place. they're going to use air power. the french are getting themselves into something. if they go there and try to take that back, they'll be in an
PBS
Jan 14, 2013 6:30pm PST
has to take action to avoid a situation where our government doesn't pay its bills. ahead of that, stocks were mixed, the blue chip dow rose almost 19 points, while the nasdaq dropped eight, and the s&p 500 down a point. >> susie: weighing on the nasdaq today: apple. the stock got crushed, on word demand for the iphone 5 is slipping. the stock closed just shy of $502, losing almost 4%. in pre-market trading the shares briefly fell below $500, the first time in nearly a year. suzanne pratt reports. >> reporter: apple has been taking a big bruising. first, it was the earnings miss for the september quarter, the second straight. then, there's been growing speculation the tech innovator is losing its edge to competitors, particularly samsung with its popular galaxy smartphone. finally, today there were reports apple dramatically cut orders for iphone 5 components, due to weak demand. to be sure, apple has not confirmed soft sales with hard numbers. but, experts it would not surprise them if consumers were sour on iphone 5. >> it may be significant, we just came through the consumer el
PBS
Jan 19, 2013 12:30am PST
. you essentially told the federal government, back off, we can take care of our own prisons. and yet the whole reason for the federal lawsuit against california was that you weren't taking care of the prisons, the health care in the prisons was inadequate. there were too many inmates in there. >> yep. >> are you saying, go away, federal government, we've cured it? >> we spent a lot of money. california now spends over $15,000 per inmate on health care. the average in prisons is about $5,000. we're spending three times more. we weren't doing that ten years ago. so we're throwing massive amounts of money hiring psychiatrists, doctors or raising their salaries. we're building magnificent state-of-the of art hospitals. we're doing a hell of a lot and people are saying, nothing's happening. what to you mean nothing's happening? we've gone from 300 million to over 2 billion. every year. this is money. it's just really drives me crazy when people say, oh, you haven't done anything. should we cut the colleges more and pump it into the prisons? we are giving health care that i would venture t
PBS
Jan 21, 2013 8:00am PST
a volley and government. the democrats typically say, well, government can do this or can't do that ask so it's really a series of arguments over the role of government and the second thing i'm curious to know about is how tough they were in a pretty partisan atmosphere. he has gotten tougher over the past couple of years with the opposition. how feist you he is he during the speech. >> things people have picked up in this run up to this inauguration is that the president four years ago in his speech came tout and he actually made a comment about how he was going to to bring an end to the petty grievances and false promises in washington. now four years later was that a false promise? >> yes. i mean, the president, i think, understandably confident and an historic election and all of that perhaps overstated what could be done. this is one place where he seen having come fiercely short and it's in bringing that sense to washington of bipartisanship and of working together and overcoming partisanship and his defenders and supporters will say oh, the republicans have been intransient and smal
PBS
Jan 15, 2013 12:00am PST
around us must be cared for and the government have role in that, people respond. one of the things i started off this campaign believing was that if people knew who i was, if they knew i had helped reform the death penalty, they have provided health insurance for children who did not have it, if they had helped set up an earned income tax credit to people who really needed it, those kinds of messages are ones that would appeal across race, region, and class. >> most people with political ambitions spent years trying to gain name recognition and a seat at the table of national politics. state senator, was not just another political figure. for months to the day after his first appearance with us in 2004 he had delivered what many described as one of the most electrifying keynote speeches in american history at the democratic national convention that year in boston. tavis: it is fascinating to me, coming into the national consciousness as we were talking the other day, we were talking and it was fascinating to sit here in this hall and watch you come into the process of -- consciousnes
PBS
Jan 18, 2013 11:00pm PST
the administration, to destroy the energy of the government and to substitute the pleasure, caprice or artifices, to the regular decisions of a respectable majority. that's just what the republicans have been doing. since 2007 when they lost the majority in the senate, they mounted or threatened to mount nearly 400 filibusters, blocking everything from equal pay to equal work, job bills and reform. as a result, there are more vacancies on the federal courts today than when president obama first took office. but hold on. when democrats were in the minority and threatening to filibuster against george w. bush's judicial nominees, their leader, harry reid, had some kind things to say about the tactic. >> the filibuster serves as a check on power and preserves our limited government. right now the only check on president bush is the democrats' ability to voice their concern in this body, the senate. if the republicans roll back our rights in this chamber, there will be no check on power. the radical right wing will be free to pursue anything they want. >> now the shoe is on the other foot. i asked l
PBS
Jan 15, 2013 6:30pm PST
or representatives debated relief from superstorm sandy today. energy analyst kevin book expects governments will increasingly be forced to spend money to mitigate or adapt to climate change. >> with every storm, with every flood, we're getting closer and closer to talking about how he handle climate change rather than how we stop it. >> reporter: pressure to address climate change may also come from outside the united states. the european union is threatening to slap trade the u.s. refuses to buy credits to offset greenhouse gas emissions from transatlantic flights. even china may help force the u.s. to act. beijing is under pressure to clear the air as pollution makes it harder and harder to breath. >> coal pollution, including greenhouse gas emissions, is something they have got to get down in their country if they're going to live there. as the largest emitter, the bogey man to which all western nation's point, begins to clean up its game, it's going to make it harder to say no. >> reporter: and progressives are hoping the president will bypass congress and use his regulatory authority u
PBS
Jan 17, 2013 12:00am PST
something. some of the very people in taylor's government would be the one calling our cell phones to say, "don't go," and it's only through the hands of god that these things happened. the world that we live in now, people don't believe these things. they tend to put it, but the work of the liberian women, god first, our nation to persevere second -- i think that's what gave us the success. but 100 percent, even from the beginning of the work, it was divinely inspired. tavis: since you mentioned the bible, there's a bible verse that comes to my mind right now that says that god has not given us a spirit of fear >> but of power, love, and of a sound mind. tavis: -- love and a sound mind. you know it well. i love that. i love a sister who knows her word. so not a spirit of fear, but of love, of power and of a sound mind, and yet i'm juxtaposing that scripture with the brutal dictatorship of charles taylor. how do you get beyond the fear of a dictator like taylor, on trial right now -- we'll come to that in a second -- on trial at the hague, outside, of course, of liberia, but how do you ge
PBS
Jan 17, 2013 6:30pm PST
it and other banks reached last week with the government over illegal foreclosure practices. results at bank of america were also weighed down by that deal. but an even bigger hit to of b. of a.'s earnings came from a settlement with fannie mae to end a dispute over bad home loans. the bank earned 3 cents a share in the period, a big drop from the 15 cents earned in the same period last year. c.e.o. brian moynihan tried to put a positive spin on today's results. >> our strategies continue to work, were seeing growth across all the core businesses. were seeing that momentum continue to accelerate. >> reporter: but for today, at least investors weren't convinced. erika miller, "n.b.r.," new york. >> susie: our next guest says citi and bank of america investors have to be prepared for a few more bumpy quarters. nancy bush is banking analyst at s.n.l. financial. so nancy when are all of these mortgage problem goesing to go away. here we are in 2013 and we're still hearing from these banks will problems with mortgages and settlements and chargeoffs. you know, how many more year does we have to go
PBS
Jan 18, 2013 6:30pm PST
and working its way out through all the different sections. if the federal government increases the money supply faster than productivity you're going to see inflation. and that's what we're seeing in food right now because the fed's been increasing the money supply greatly. >> tom: john, let me ask you about the investor class as a stakeholder. whole foods stock is up 16% year over year. is the stock price the clearest expressionave company value? >> maybe not always in the short term. i think as ben graham once said, in the short term the stock market is a voting machine. but in the long run, it's a weighing machine. so i do think sometimes stock prices get out of whack from the intrinsic value of a company. but it tend to correct itself. so it can swing wildly in one direction or the other but it will correct itself. so i don't know-- it's certainly an important indicator. i don't know if it's the best indicator. but you need to pay attention to it if you're a public company. >> tom: you certainly do, as you do, certainly, as want co-c.e.o. of whole foods. john mackey, the coauthor of
PBS
Jan 21, 2013 6:30pm PST
together between business and government and, you know, i'm optimistic that we'll sort it out but, boy, it sure looks ugly right now. >> susie: for more on michaelportier's research and articles go to nbr.com and check out our partnership with some of the nation's top business schools like harvard. >> tom: while beer wasn't invented in america, u.s. brewers are thinking small to make it big. small craft brewers are claiming a bigger stake of the industry's annual $300 billion in sales. mike hegedus takes us to one small regional brewer on the verge of going national. >> reporter: it is the face of success illuminated by a welders' torch, a german- engineered expansion assembled with bavarian precision. a $10 million project to increase production of-- roll out the barrels, baby, it's beer! this is the lagunitas brewing company operation in petaluma, california, on the edge of bucolic sonoma county pasture land. lagunitas, with 150 employees, is in the sweet spot of the u.s. beer industry. sales by small, regional craft brewers making up for sagging national brand sales. >> it's about p
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)